Michelle Honeyager

About Michelle Honeyager

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager is a freelance writer living in Southeastern Wisconsin. You can find out more about her at https://www.clippings.me/michellelovrine.

Ayurvedic Herbs to Add to Your Diet

Top view image of turmeric latte over white wooden table with copyspace

As far as holistic health trends go, Ayurveda has been popping up everywhere in recent years. There are even Ayurvedic health drinks and recipes being offered in some of the trendiest restaurants. It’s no surprise that this ancient Indian system of medicine is becoming more popular.

Ayurveda takes a truly holistic approach toward the entire human body and mind. It seeks to balance a person, rather than treating illnesses after they manifest. Though it can do that, too. With how popular and versatile ayurveda is, it’s tempting to just throw a bunch of Indian herbs into your cooking and hope it helps. But there’s a rich philosophy behind Ayurveda that will help you make the most of Ayurvedic herbs. more→

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5 Spring Vegan Soup Recipes

Leek potato and watercress soup3

Spring and summer are headed our way. While that may mean fun in the sun and a great reason to boost those mood-elevating vitamin D levels, it can also be a time for heartache. Heartache because soup season is over. Or is it? We’ve rounded up some spring seasonal vegan soup recipes that use spring veggies and herbs to create a lighter taste that works great in the warmer months. Check out these spring vegan soup recipes to change up your soup game and continuing making this lovely, versatile dish. more→

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Top 3 Benefits of a Vegan Diet

Wicker basket with assorted raw organic vegetables in the garden.

In a world where everything seems to contain at least butter and eggs, being vegan can be tricky. People may even ask how you’re able to do it and then assert that they could never be vegan. But there are many vegan diet benefits. Whether someone in your life is thinking of going vegan, you’re considering a full vegan diet yourself or you just need a reminder of why you follow this lifestyle, below are several vegan diet benefits.

It does the body good

caldwell esselstyn vegan plantbased whole foods quote

One of the prime reasons people go vegan is for the untold health benefits. Vegans have a negative stereotype of being anemic and deprived of protein, but being vegan has been linked to a number of health benefits. Below are some of the top vegan diet benefits.

If you’re vegan, that means you’re cutting out all animal products, including high-cholesterol meats and eggs. You’re replacing those with healthier foods, like whole grains, fruits, veggies, peas, nuts, seeds and beans, to make up the nutrients and protein you’d be getting from meat otherwise.

One study looked at the Nutrient intake and Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) across a low-fat vegan diet and an American Diabetes Association recommended diet, and found that the vegans raised their score. They increased fiber, vitamins C and K, total vitamin A activity, potassium, magnesium, folate and beta carotene.

However, they also reduced their intake of B-12, calcium and vitamin D, right along with fat, cholesterol and sodium. There’s no denying that eating vegan is a balancing act that will require careful supervision of B-12, calcium, iron, vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acid intake, to name a few nutrients, but overall it leads to a healthier lifestyle. Vegans have less risk of heart disease and cancer, according to one study. Vegan diets also lead to greater fat loss when trying to lose weight.

It’s an easy way to go green

One of the most impactful ways to help the environment is to cut animal products out of your diet. Meat takes a huge amount of land, water and plant foods to produce, so it’s the easiest way to reduce your carbon footprint. It’s been in the news for awhile that cutting beef alone can reduce your carbon footprint more than driving a car.

In addition to carbon issues, there’s the fact that swathes of land are cleared out to let cattle graze, meaning a greater risk of land erosion and the loss of natural habitats for wildlife.

It’s cruelty-free

Another great reason to go vegan is because of animal rights. Many people swear off of meat after they see the deplorable conditions that animals raised for meat are kept in. You might be one of them. From hens kept in cramped battery cages to sick animals being neglected, all of these are realities of the modern day factory farms.

And while getting free range and organic meat is an option, the ASPCA estimates that more than 99% of farm animals in the U.S. are raised in factory farms. Plus, there’s the ethical issue of killing just to get nutrients that can be sourced from supplements and/or plant-based products.

So next time someone is telling you being vegan is dumb, or you’re doubting the lifestyle yourself, just remember these vegan diet benefits: health benefits, the reduced environmental impact and that being vegan means a more cruelty-free existence.

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9 Plant-Based Foods That Will Help You Sleep

hummus dip plate on wooden table

Did you know there are foods that will help you sleep? There’s a lot in modern society to disrupt our sleep, and food could counteract these sleep disruptors.

Late night glowing screens, general stress, insane news stories, caffeine too late in the day, exercise too late in the day, certain medications, getting really involved in binging Netflix and deciding your painting muse is only active at 1:12 a.m. are just some of the ways our sleep can get disrupted. more→

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10 Great Quinoa Bowl Recipes

Quinoa, kale, and artichoke salad recipe

If you need an easy way to serve up a ton of protein and nutrients in one go, you’ll want to look into these vegan quinoa bowl recipes. These quinoa bowl recipes serve up fruit, veggies and tasty spices all heaped onto some delicious quinoa. Serve these up for an easy breakfast, lunch or dinner—seriously, you can have them any time of day! more→

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How to Use Less Energy When You Cook

steaming mixed vegetables in the wok, asian style cooking vegetarian and healthy, selected focus, narrow depth of field

Trying to use less energy when you cook is an admirable goal. Energy efficient cooking reduces emissions and it can help save money in the household budget. California’s Consumer Energy Center estimates that cooking casserole costs $0.03 in the microwave, versus an electric oven at $0.16. Rather than trying to cook everything in the microwave (good luck frying anything), there are also plenty of other ways to save energy while you cook. more→

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Which Vegan Foods Release the Least Amount of CO2?

Buddha bowl of mixed vegetable with avocado, carrots, spinach, romsnesco cauliflower and radishes

One of the biggest advantages of eating vegan meals is being able to reduce your carbon emissions to help the environment. By now, eating less or no meat to reduce our carbon footprint is pretty cemented in the green living lexicon. The vegan carbon footprint is far smaller than other diets.

The Guardian even estimates that giving up beef can lower your carbon footprint more than using a car. Red meat uses 28 times more land and 11 times more water than pork or chicken. Red meat also produces five times more climate change emissions. Taken a step further, red meat requires 160 times more land and produces eleven times more greenhouse gasses than vegan staples like potatoes, wheat and rice. more→

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Creamy Vegan Salad Dressing Recipes

Parsley Salad Dressing

Salad dressing can get a little tricky when you’re vegan. Most are made out of oils and vinegars. But if you want a hearty, creamy dressing, many have mayonnaise in them. Luckily, it’s easy to get a creamy, vegan salad dressing by using ingredients like vegan mayonnaise, hummus or even nuts like cashews. Below are some of the top creamy vegan salad dressing recipes.

Vegan ranch

vegan creamy ranch dressing

Image: Happy Healthy Life

If you want to make a creamy salad dressing, you’ll probably be craving that staple ranch pretty quick. This vegan recipe calls for just vegan mayo, the juice of one small lemon and your favorite herbs or spices to taste. Some examples include dill, parsley, chives, garlic powder or onion powder.

Vegan Catalina

There’s nothing quite like a thick Catalina dressing. You can make this from ketchup, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, dry mustard, onion powder and chili powder. You just shake them together very well in a covered jar.

Vegan Caesar

You can also make a tasty Caesar salad using this recipe. It calls for plain hummus to keep it thick. Mustard, lemon juice, lemon zest, capers and garlic add kick to this dressing.

Creamy vegan dressing

This dressing tends to defy classification. It’s just listed as “crazy good creamy salad dressing.” It contains cashews, olive oil, garlic and onion powder, to name a few ingredients, all blended together.

Lemon cashew dressing

This recipe gets its creaminess from blenderized cashews. Other ingredients include extra virgin olive oil, garlic, Celtic sea salt and lemon juice. The whole thing gets blended for a creamy consistency that looks sort of like milk.

Cucumber tahini salad dressing

If you love the sesame taste of tahini, you’ll love this recipe. It calls for five tablespoons of raw tahini, along with cucumbers, lemon juice, garlic and cumin. This one you also blend until completely smooth and creamy.

Tri-pepper dressing

If you love the zesty taste of pepper, give this dressing recipe a try. Soy milk keeps it creamy, yet vegan. The recipe calls for pink peppercorns, black pepper and white pepper. Ingredients like onion powder and garlic add a further kick. White balsamic vinegar also keeps it more on the lighter side of dressings.

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