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Handmade Kitchen Gifts for the Cook, Hostess, and Foodie

christmas cooking fir tree made from flour on a dark table ingredients for baking frozen cranberry and dried fruits on dark background top view

Nothing says thoughtful like a gift that is handmade. Handmade kitchen gifts are one-of-a-kind, and they’re more personal than buying yet another gift from your favorite kitchen brand. These handmade kitchen gifts are the perfect gifts for anyone who loves to cook, host dinner parties, or for anyone who simply enjoys eating! Check out our list of handmade kitchen gifts for the cook, hostess, and foodie. more→

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Delicious Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes

classic vegan thanksgiving bread stuffing

Why center your Thanksgiving dinner on the turkey? With many trusted and tasty recipes online, creating a vegan Thanksgiving menu can be simple, delicious and compassionate.

Browsing our favorite vegan Thanksgiving recipes can make it fun to plan a vegan Thanksgiving dinner that is sure to please everyone at the table. Vegan recipes for appetizers, soups, vegetable side dishes, main courses, breads and desserts will ensure no one misses the meat. more→

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Vegan Thanksgiving Cooking Made Easy

Rice and Pecan Stuffed Acorn Squash

Want the secret for cooking a successful and delicious vegan Thanksgiving dinner that everyone—including those family members and friends who crack jokes and claim to only eat meat—will be raving about?

It’s simple: Design a well-rounded vegan Thanksgiving menu that is filled with surprising and satisfying vegetable-based dishes and vegan twists on traditional favorites.

At first, for vegans, it may seem overwhelming to plan a Thanksgiving holiday meal, which usually focuses on turkey and the trimmings. But the variety and number of dishes presented at the vegan Thanksgiving table actually creates the perfect opportunity to show guests how easy and delicious vegan cooking can be. more→

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How to Be Vegan in a Southern City

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A Southerner’s perception of ‘being Southern’ varies drastically from person to person, region to region, state to state, and SEC team to SEC team. To me, being southern means growing up next to one of the most beautiful mountain ranges in the world and near pasture fields far from busy towns or cities. To some of my friends, being southern means a cold beer and shotguns trump fancy venues in fancy cities. Everyone has a different opinion. However, few people pass through Dixie without sampling some of the available culinary art, and it is art. Needless to say, being vegan in a southern city isn’t the norm. With a bag of flour and a few sticks of butter, my great grandmother could whip up a meal fit for the Queen of England. She passed this magical talent on to my grandmother and her sisters, but now my own cooking preferences, as well those of a growing number around me, center more on vegetables. more→

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Ahiflower May Be the Best Omega-3 Source for Vegans

white-flower-on-ahiflower-shrub

Today, I’d like to introduce you to Ahiflower. When I scheduled a call with the folks from Ahiflower about advertising with us, I’ll admit to expecting something a little less exciting. Ahiflower is a new source of your daily omega-3 fatty acids, which we know most of us can use. Having only been vegetarian a short time, I have (regrettably) taken fish oil and krill oil supplements in the past, as well as flax seed oil. And, here was Ahiflower, a new omega-3 supplement. And folks, It’s difficult to make omega-3 fatty acids sexy these days.

Yet, I think Ahiflower did make omega-3 fatty acids sexy again. Or, at least they’re setting a new and very high standard for these essential fatty acids. Here are the full benefits of Ahiflower compared to the alternatives. It gets somewhat technical (lots of good health info!), so I’ve gone ahead and broken it down to the most important points, without all the numbers.

So, what is Ahiflower…

ahiflower-seeds-on-plant

Aside from being a lush bush with beautiful white flowers, Ahiflower is a newly harnessed non-GMO source of omega-3 fatty acids. Well, it’s also a source for your daily omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. More specifically, those are the omega-3 ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) and SDA (stearidonic acid), omega-6 GLA (gamma linolenic acid) and LA (linoleic acid); and omega-9 OA (oleic acid).

Ahiflower is also 100% vegan, plant-sourced, 100% sustainable and 100% traceable to the British fields in which it was grown. Did I mention it’s gluten free and Kosher?

Why does that sound so impressive?

That’s because it is so impressive. Especially for an entirely plant-sourced omega-3 supplement. There is no other plant-based supplement that has the same combination of omega-3 ALA, omega-3 SDA, omega-6 LA and omega-6 GLA fatty acids that Ahiflower provides. It also has the highest-available SDA content, which converts easily into EPA (the type of omega-3 fatty acid typically only found in marine oils) more efficiently than any other plant-sourced supplement. It’s far more efficient than flax in this regard, which relies almost entirely on omega-3 ALA. Oh, that also means you don’t need to take as many gelatin-free capsules every daily. Definitely a plus.

It gets better still

close-up-of-ahiflower-seeds

Harvested Ahiflower seeds

Ahiflower is 100% sustainable, unlike any marine oils. Not only is Ahiflower eco-friendly, it’s also incredibly efficient with our precious Mother Earth. It’s impossible to separate our eating and the world’s resources. We just can’t escape the topic of environmentally friendly farming. There are two very important resources needed for farming that are getting scarcer and scarcer: space and water. Future crops are going to have to produce more per acre than ever before, and with less water.

That’s another reason to love Ahiflower. Flax has been the go-to vegetarian and vegan omega-3 supplement in years gone by, but that really needs to change. It simply takes too much space and too much water to meet human demand with flax.

Good news, because Ahiflower is up to 400% more effectively metabolized than flax in humans (yes, 2 human clinical studies have already been completed), Ahiflower requires less land and less water than flax to deliver the healthy omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids we all need.

Grown only in select fields within the United Kingdom, Ahiflower is the most environmentally friendly omega-3 supplement. Not only is it more efficiently produced than flax, it is also a fantastic habitat and source of nourishment for our threatened pollinators. Seriously, bees dig these little flowers like nobody’s business.

And just in case you weren’t convinced

ahiflower-crop-in-bloom

Ahiflower crop in bloom

You know how I just said Ahiflower is only grown on very select pieces of land in the United Kingdom? That makes Ahiflower 100% traceable. That’s right, you can find out exactly where your Ahiflower oil came from. Unlike flax, which is grown throughout Russia, China, and Kazakhstan, as well as several other countries and is not 100% traceable. Not like Ahiflower. You could totally meet the farmer who grew your Ahiflower. Okay, that I can’t promise, but it’s like that.

Grown only in UK fields, the Ahiflower seed is turned into oil at a single processing plant in Canada. Unlike many supplements processed in China and other countries, Ahiflower is only turned into oil in one solitary plant, ensuring more control over the supply chain than flax.

To wrap it up

Normally I don’t do these sorts of things. I’ve been helping Nava and VegKitchen behind the scenes for over a year, but this is one of the few times I’ve written something for the site. And yes, it is sponsored by Ahiflower. Most of the information is from them, but opinions are all me.

As I’ve made the important decision to go vegetarian (and hopefully one day vegan!), it’s become even more important to me to think about how my eating and my diet affect the world around me. The decision for me was based on two things: not eating animals and helping to preserve the planet. I’ll admit to being a really bad environmentalist most of the time, but all of us making small changes can have an immeasurable impact.

Luckily for us, when it comes to our daily omega-3 supplement, doing what’s good and beneficial for our bodies is also better for the earth. If you haven’t considered Ahiflower yet, I highly recommend giving it a try. As they say, it’s “Better than flax. Not from fish.”

If you’d like to try Ahiflower oil in vegan softgels or as a liquid oil (great for smoothies!), you can find a list of places that sell Ahiflower on their website. You can also enter for your chance to win a 3 month supply of Ahiflower here on VegKitchen!

This article originally appeared on OhMyVeggies.com as Why Ahiflower May Replace Flax Seed Oil for Vegetarians and Vegans.

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FreshWorks Produce Saver: Make your groceries last longer

Rubbermaid FreshWorks Produce Saver

Buying groceries is an investment. We spend our time at the grocery store carefully reading food labels, checking to see if items are organic and where the produce comes from, for example. I could easily spend a good two hours in the grocery store. We might also plan our meals for the week ahead and create a very specific shopping list. With all this work, planning, and time, it’s incredibly disappointing when produce goes bad before we get a chance to use it! I often find I buy cilantro to use throughout the next two weeks and, to my disappointment, it goes bad after just a few days. Keeping fruit and vegetables as fresh as the day we bought them is no easy task. But what  can we do. Allegedly, we can avoid opening the fridge to spoiled produce by using FreshWorks™ Produce Saver, an innovative storage container that claims to incorporate patented technology to keep fruits and veggies fresher for up to 80% longer, #LongLiveProduce! more→

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West Coast, Best Coast: 4 Stops on Your Vegan Foodie-Friendly Road Trip

Cropped image of assorted salads in a buffet

Stop it, stop it right now. Stop whatever you’re doing and listen. It’s time to go on a road trip — that vegan foodie-friendly road trip you’ve been dreaming about for months.

You’ll see some sights, jam to your favorite songs, go on a hike, discover a new city on your bike and, most importantly, try the local grub. If you’re serious about planning a vacation around your vegan values, send this tips to your friends and start packing. more→

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Easy ways to reuse cooking oil so it doesn’t end up in the drain

portrait of people cooking healthy vegetarian chinese food capcay

While the salads and raw dishes are common in a vegan diet, it is almost impossible to avoid cooking grease altogether. From leftover frying oil to coconut oil, we don’t always think twice before rinsing our pots and pains over the drain. It’s a common habit for us to rinse our pans, and along with them, rinse the cooking grease straight into the drain, but is this really that bad? While we may have never asked ourselves this question, rinsing cooking grease in your sink, whether it’s from frying, sautéing or roasting vegetables, is in fact a problem with terrible and expensive consequences.

In the same way fat and cholesterol block our veins and arteries, fat in drains leads to blocked pipes, sewer blockages in municipal lines, and costly sewage backups in your home and the environment. Rinsing cooking grease with hot water doesn’t help either. Cooking grease will quickly cool and congeal in the pipes. So, what is a healthy, vegan cook do?

Below are some easy and affordable methods for getting rid of cooking grease in a safe, responsible, and creative way (some are even tasty!). But before you check out these cooking grease solutions, first learn how to limit how much fat you use to begin with. Using less fat while cooking means fewer calories in your dish and a lower grocery bill—because your cooking fats will last longer. Here are some easy ways to use less fat while cooking.

  • In lieu of deep frying, roast or broil food in the oven, shallow-fry in a pan on the stovetop, or fire up the grill.
  • When sautéing, decrease the amount of fat your recipe calls for (use a teaspoon instead of a tablespoon).
  • Replace oil with small amounts of water. Add a little at a time to keep food moving and browning in the pan without steaming.
  • Always measure fats instead of free pouring them.
  • Steam veggies instead of sautéing them.

Here are some easy and cheap alternatives to getting rid of cooking grease in a safe, responsible, and creative way.


Source: Fix.com Blog

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