Jewish New Year

Two Potato Kugel

White and sweet potato kugel

This potato kugel (which is a baked pudding or a casserole) is reminiscent of my grandmother’s, but I kicked up the nutritional profile a bit with the inclusion of sweet potatoes and taking out the eggs. This version is less rich but still full of potato-y comfort, a cross between hashed browns and scalloped potatoes, and a great side dish at a Passover meal. Being gluten-free, I omitted the traditional matzo meal, but feel free to add that as described if you have no issues with wheat. By the way, a mandolin slicer works great for getting the potatoes into uniform matchsticks. Recipe and photo contributed by Maria Rose from Vegan Street. more→

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Rosh Hashana Apple Rugelach

Apple walnut vegan rugelach

Apples and honey are the traditional treat to celebrate the Rosh Hashana, in hopes that it will be a sweet New Year. Apples and agave or maple syrup have always provided this same sentiment just fine, but now I have something even better to kick off a new 365 days with. Rolling up a mixture of walnuts, apples, agave, and just a tiny touch of orange blossom water for that floral hint you’d find in honey, the standard buttery rugelach dough becomes a whole lot more special. more→

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Raw or Nearly-Raw Cold Beet Borscht

Nearly raw beet borscht

The ingredients of classic cold beet borscht are usually cooked together, then chilled, but in this version, there’s no need to cook at all, unless you’d like to lightly pre-cook the beets. After this has a chance to chill, don’t be shy about amping up the lemon/agave contrast to your taste. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. more→

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Moroccan-Flavored Tofu with Apricots, Olives, and Almonds

Moroccan-Style Tofu with Apricots, Almonds, and Olives

Bursting with an offbeat combination of flavors—salty, sweet, mellow, and tart—this recipe is inspired by a classic Moroccan recipe. This is a wonderful choice for a vegan main dish for a Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashanah) menu. Most of the original ingredients remain in this veganized recipe; the baked tofu stands in for the chicken customarily used in this dish. Don’t be daunted by the ingredient list; it’s an easy dish that comes together quickly and is also a feast for the eyes. Recipe adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photos by Susan Voisin.
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Seven-Vegetable Couscous

Seven-vegetable couscous

Seven is a lucky number in Jewish tradition, so a soup or stew featuring seven vegetables is a Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year) favorite among Sephardic Jews. Despite the longish ingredient list, it’s easy and quick enough to serve as a mid-week main dish even if you don’t observe the Jewish New Year. Feel free to replace other veggies for the ones listed below. Want a gluten-free version? Substitute  quinoa for the couscous. From Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photo by Susan Voisin, FatFree Vegan Kitchen. more→

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Beet, Cucumber, and Orange Salad

Beet and orange salad

If you like beets, you’ll absolutely love them combined with the crunch of cucumber and the sweetness of citrus. This salad can be enjoyed all through fresh orange season, adding color and flavor to cool-weather meals. more→

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Moroccan-Style Vegetable Stew

moroccan vegetable stew

This delicious Moroccan-inspired stew looks as good as it tastes. It’s a wonderful way to warm up cold season dinners, with sweet sugar pumpkin or butternut squash in an aromatic broth. Adapted from Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons by Nava Atlas. Photo by Theresa Raffetto. more→

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Sweet Potato Tzimmes

Sweet potato tzimmes recipe

An Eastern European standard, tzimmes is a roasted vegetable dish that is made a number of ways, depending on the occasion. For the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, the appropriate ingredients include carrots and sweet potatoes, with the added sweetness of fresh and dried fruits. Recipe adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photox by Susan Voisin. more→

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