Natural Foods Guides

How to Buy and Use Wasabi

Wasabi

Wasabi is sometimes known as Japanese horseradish, an apt description, since its flavor is so reminiscent of the horseradish we know. The word wasabi is translated from the Japanese as “mountain hollyhock,” and it is from the ground, dried root of this plant that the hot spice is derived. Its fresh, pungent taste has made it a traditional condiment to serve alongside sushi and other Japanese dishes. more→

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Kañiwa: A “new” ancient supergrain

kaniwa salad

Recently, I was introduced to kañiwa, and was surprised that another South American quinoa-like superfood is making its way to the market. Kañiwa is a relative of quinoa, and like the latter, grows in Peru and Bolivia. It’s an excellent source of protein and amino acids, is exceptionally high in iron, and is gluten-free. Dark reddish-brown in color and about half the size of a tiny quinoa seed, kañiwa cooks up quickly to resemble a smaller version of red quinoa.

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Baking with Whole Grain Flours

Whole Grain flour

Few sensory experiences offer more pleasure than the wonderful flavors and aromas of homemade baked goods. Or better yet, the hearty, nutty-flavored whole grain baked goods.  Whole wheat flour is just one of several players in this healthful field that includes barley, oat, rye, and spelt flour, among others. Even if you don’t have the time to make your own yeasted bread, quick baked goods can be equally rewarding. more→

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Go Nuts for Goodness Sake!

Almonds on table

How often I’ve heard friends respond to my offer of nuts by saying, “Oh, no thank you, they’re too fattening.” In other instances, people who simply cannot stop eating them tell me, “I know nuts are bad for me, but I just love ‘em.” Many people are convinced that nuts are unhealthful because they are high in fat. What they fail to realize is the fats contained in nuts are actually beneficial. more→

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Cooking with Whole Grains

Whole Farro in a scoop

When you need a grain to cushion stews and stir-fries, to stuff into vegetables, or to power pilafs, chances are you reach for rice. And while there’s nothing wrong with rice—particularly if you’ve made the switch to brown—exploring a variety of whole grains can expand your culinary horizons and add even greater nourishment to your meals. more→

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Bean Basics

Legume varieties

Beans and legumes are nutritional powerhouses, rich in protein and fiber, and very low in fat. They boast a slew of vitamins (B vitamins in particular) and essential minerals (notably iron). If you’re among the uninitiated, the following guide should demystify beans for you. If you’re a bean aficionado, take a look for new information and tips. To get you primed to add more beans to your repertoire, here are  VegKitchen’s categories for delicious, high-protein bean recipes: more→

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Versatile, Easy Tofu Recipes

Easy Curried Sweet Potatoes and Tofu

If you’re looking for a wide array of easy tofu recipes that will please adults and kids alike, you’ve come to the right place! Tofu is a superb food to add to the repertoire of growing children, and pays bountiful dividends in women’s and men’s diets as well. Many nutritionists experts recommend completely eliminating meat and high-fat dairy products as protein sources and getting more from plant-based foods such as grains, legumes, and soyfoods. more→

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Creative Cooking with Sea Vegetables

Wakame Salad

I remember my first taste of sushi in Boulder, Colorado, summer of 1978. There I was studying voice, dance, arts in education and theater at the Naropa Institute. New friends invited me for lunch. They served rice and vegetables wrapped in toasted nori with a spicy wasabi dip. As they spoke about their macrobiotic diet, I fell in love with my first taste of seaweed. more→

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