Easy Vegetable Stir Fries

Gingery Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Cashews

Bok Choy Stir Fry with Cashews from Leslie Cerier

Quick, and colorful, this bok choy stir-fry gets an extra rich flavor from lots of cashews and ginger. You can also use extra-virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil, or sesame oil for this delicious vegan and gluten-free side dish. Recipe contributed by Leslie Cerier. Photo by Tracey Eller. more→

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Mixed Vegetable Stir-Fry (“Buddhist’s Delight”)

Broccoli and baby corn stir-fry - Buddhist's delight recipe

If you’re a longtime vegetarian or vegan, you’ve likely ordered a version of this Chinese restaurant standard. It’s easy to make at home, and always a treat for anyone who loves Asian-style meals.  Serve over hot cooked brown rice or Asian noodles, along with a simple slaw-type salad or a mixed greens salad with orange sections and toasted almond slices. For protein, choose your favorite simple tofu, tempeh, or seitan preparation to serve alongside or atop this dish.

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Simple Stir-Fried Tofu with Spring Greens

Tofu and bok choy stir-fry recipe

This easy stir-fry highlights fresh, quick-cooking spring greens, combined with tofu. See the note below for suggestions on which leafy greens to use; you can vary it each time. My favorite is baby bok choy! more→

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Stir-Fried Greens with Napa Cabbage and Tofu

Stir-fried-greens with tofu and napa cabbage

Napa cabbage combines nicely with darker leafy greens, adding a lighter texture and flavor as well as visual interest. This dish comes very close to being downright addictive. It’s an amped-up variation of Stir-Fried Chard with Napa Cabbage from Wild About Greens,with tofu added, and the flexibility of using whichever kinds of greens are most abundant in your garden or at the farm market. Serve with (or over) a simple noodle or grain dish and a bright, colorful salad. more→

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Spicy Orange-Sesame Stir-Fry

Orange-Sesame Stir-Fry

I tell my health coaching clients to get at least four colors onto their plates at every meal, with green being the main color. Without getting too science-y about it, the nutrients in fruit and vegetables lie in their color, and therefore eating lots of colors ensures that we’re getting lots of nutrients. Pretty simple, huh?

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Ginger Cashew Cauliflower

ginger-cashew cauliflower

After you cut each piece of cauliflower into tiny florets using a small, sharp paring knife, the rest of the recipe goes quickly. For a complete meal, serve with cooked brown rice and/or tofu, and a colorful salad. Recipe reprinted with permission from Ripe: A Fresh, Colorful Approach to Fruits and Vegetables * © 2012 by Cheryl Sternman Rule, photography by Paulette Phlipot. Reprinted by permission of Running Press, a member of the Perseus Book Group. more→

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Thai-Flavored Tofu and Broccoli

Fresh broccoli on a plate

Serve this easy dish of tofu and broccoli over rice or bean-thread noodles, a simple coleslaw dressed in sesame-ginger dressing, and strips of red bell pepper and cherry tomatoes. more→

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Napa Cabbage and Mushroom Stir-Fry

Napa cabbage

Napa cabbage is a leafier relative of bok choy. It’s quick and delicious in a stir-fry with mushrooms. This is compatible with Asian rice, noodle, and tofu dishes.  more→

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