Recipes

Almond Feta-Style Vegan Cheese

Almond feta-style cheese by Miyoko Schinner

I had almost forgotten the joy that feta cheese can add to dishes. For example, the wonderful Greek spinach pie, spanakopita—I had basically given up on this entirely. I’d made and had many vegan versions of it, but without the briny flavor of feta, the flavors just fell flat. After much knocking around in my noggin, I came up with the perfect vegan substitute.

Salty and briny, this feta works beautifully crumbled over salads or slightly melted in all of the traditional dishes. Best of all, stored in brine, it keeps for weeks, getting stronger in flavor and more delicious as time goes by (in fact, it vastly improves after a month, so make this weeks ahead of time if you can). Reprinted by permission from The Homemade Vegan Pantry** by Miyoko Schinner, © 2015. Photographs by Eva Kolenko, © 2015 Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. more→

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Corn Muffins with Black Beans and Zucchini

black bean, corn, and zucchini muffins

This savory vegan muffin makes good use of summer’s fresh corn and the season’s abundance of zucchini. Other times of year, you can use frozen kernels, and of course, zucchini is a year-round veggie. These make a perfect accompaniment to hot or cold soups. Black beans give these a bit of heft, making them a nice change of pace for the lunch box. Photos by Evan Atlas.
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No-Cook Cold Soups for Summer Refreshment

Cold White Bean and Tomato Soup

Even though we can use air-conditioning to mitigate summer heat in the kitchen, being able to make cold soups without turning on a single burner is a gift on the hottest days. Some cold soups have cooked ingredients and then are chilled in the fridge, but the ones presented here don’t require any heat at all. It’s good to chill them before serving for ultimate refreshment, but you can serve them right away if need be (you can always swirl 3 or 4 ice cubes into them before serving to get that chilled effect). First up, Cool White Bean and Tomato Soup, shown above, which makes for a flavorful, nearly instant and surprisingly hearty cold soup.  more→

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Laura’s Date-Nut Truffles

Laura's Date Nut Truffles

If you’re in need of a fuss-free, healthy dessert that will impress guests, look no further. Laura Theodore, the “Jazzy Vegetarian,” created this simple yet decadent-tasting treat for just such an occasion. This treat is gluten-free, oil-free, quick, and easy. Contributed by Ann Oliverio, from Crave, Eat, Heal: Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes to Satisfy Every Appetitereprinted with permission © 2015 Front Table Books.

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Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond Salad

Zucchini Apricot Salad

Inspiration can come from anywhere at any time. One evening I was watching Anthony Bourdain’s show, Parts Unknown, and he was highlighting the foods of Israel and Palestine. At one meal, he was served a raw zucchini salad with apricots. I have no idea what the other ingredients were in this dish, but I had a bunch of fresh apricots that needed eating. Roasting the apricots brings out their flavor and sweetness. A tangy apricot dressing over strips of zucchini sounded like a quick and delicious summer meal. Contributed by Ann Oliverio, from Crave, Eat, Heal: Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes to Satisfy Every Appetitereprinted with permission © 2015 Front Table Books. more→

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5 Delicious Veggie Recipes for the Grill (and One for Fruit!)

Grilled Pineapple

Here are a few ways to make the most of the veggies on the grill, some tried and true (eggplant, peppers, and some that you may not have considered (cabbage, asparagus). First up, Grilled Pineapple (above) is amazing. It’s a perfect foil for vegan proteins (tofu, tempeh, seitan, or vegan sausage) and veggies cooked on the barbecue.  more→

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Blood Orange, Olive, and Basil Salad

Blood orange and olive salad by Jason Wyrick

This salad, typically made with whatever fresh oranges are on hand and made with blood oranges here, is a popular winter dish throughout the south of Italy. Fennel and red onion are popular additions, but my favorite version (this one) concentrates on the interplay of the sweetness of the oranges, the saltiness of the olives, the pop of the basil, and the smoothness of the olive oil. It showcases one of the quintessential elements of Italian cuisine, namely that you don’t need complicated recipes to make outstanding food. You only need outstanding ingredients and the willingness to let them speak for themselves.” Recipe by Jason Wyrick, from Living the Farm Sanctuary Life* by Gene Baur with Gene Stone, © 2015 by Gene Baur. Photographs © 2015 by Rodale Inc. Reprinted by Permission of Rodale Books. more→

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Sesame Soba Noodles with Collard Greens and Tempeh Croutons

Sesame soba noodles with collard greens recipe

I’m a complete noodle fanatic, but a bowl of pasta with tomato sauce doesn’t quite do the trick for me. For me, an ideal noodle dish is one in which veggies have at least equal billing. This Asian-flavored dish of soba noodles and calcium-rich collard greens is flavored with a triple dose of sesame (another great source of calcium): tahini, seeds, and oil. Another bonus — soba noodles made purely of buckwheat are gluten free. If that’s not of concern to you, other long noodles — udon or even whole wheat spaghetti — can be substituted. Recipe by Nava Atlas, from Living the Farm Sanctuary Life* by Gene Baur with Gene Stone, © 2015 by Gene Baur. Photographs © 2015 by Rodale Inc. Reprinted by Permission of Rodale Books. more→

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