Seasonal Produce Guides

Fresh Corn: Our Native Harvest

Fresh corn on table

“Korn has got one thing that nobody else has got,” wrote nineteenth-century humorist Josh Billings, “and that is a kob.” Equally indisputable is that the greatest gift the Native Americans gave the European settlers of Colonial America was the ability to cultivate corn. No other single food has had as great an impact on the development of American cookery. Since it grew well in poor soil and needed little skill to cultivate, corn quickly became a staple crop of the colonists. more→

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Lettuce: A New Spin

Lettuce varieties

At farmer’s markets and community supported agriculture farms, lettuces make their appearance in May and go strong through mid-summer. When I belonged to a CSA farm, each week, we could take as many as three healthy heads of lettuce for our share. No matter how much one loves salads, three heads a week is a lot of lettuce! If you shop at farm markets, they, too will be bursting with lettuces. more→

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Asparagus: Buying, Cooking, and Enjoying

bunch of asparagus

After long winter months of root vegetables and tubers, the farmers market re-awakens in spring – pulsating with energy and brimming with cheerful colors, enticing smells and delicious flavors that make for a full sensory experience. Strolling by the vibrant stands of produce, you’ll find everything to fulfill the stirring desires of re-awakened palates: fresh field strawberries, crisp green beans, plump artichokes and, of course, bright green asparagus.

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Chili Peppers: Healthy Hot Stuff

Red chili peppers

Chili peppers are an indispensable part of many ethnic cuisines that have become intrinsic to the healthy cook’s home repertoire. Chilies are one of the most widely produced and utilized condiments in the world, after salt and black pepper.

Members of the capsicum genus, their flavors range from mild to sweet to explosively hot. There are hundreds of varieties, with inconsistent names and little standardization of labeling. Here are a few basic guidelines to help the curious chili lover: more→

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Mushrooms—A Guide to Wild and Cultivated Varieties

Mushrooms on cutting board

Not long ago, when a recipe called for mushrooms, it meant the white button variety. What else was there? Now, nearly every natural foods store, supermarket, and produce grocery offers a wide array of mushrooms. Mushroom lovers, you’ll find many tasty recipes on VegKitchen’s category of recipes featuring mushrooms. more→

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5 Simple Ways to Eat More Leafy Greens

Greens in colander

Everyone’s mad for greens these days! Once you get into the leafy greens habit, it’s hard to stop. And why would you? Greens are acknowledged as the most nutrient-rich group of veggies, with a multitude of benefits. The hardier greens, like kale, chard, and collards, are superb sources of highly absorbable calcium, a perk that’s especially valuable to vegans. They’re one of the best sources of Vitamin K, essential to bone health, and are abundant in vitamins A, B (especially folic acid) and C. Greens also provide a wealth of antioxidants and chlorophyll, are protective against cancers, and are anti-inflammatory. more→

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Fresh Herbs: Growing, Buying, Storing, and Enjoying

Basil, thyme, and parsley in cans

When a recipe calls for basil and dill, do you reach for the spice rack? This summer, find out why the best cooks go to the garden instead. Their distinctive flavors and aromas enhance summer’s produce as dried, store-bought herbs never could. If you’re hesitant about  new flavors, start with a little less than a recipe indicates. If your an aficionado, lavish summer fare with herbs to your heart’s content. Here are just a few of the fresh herb-flavored recipes you’ll find on VegKitchen: more→

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Spinach: A Powerhouse Veggie

Spinach in a crate

When vegetables are rated in terms of overall nutritional value, spinach is usually among the powerhouse veggies that top the list. It’s vitamin-rich and a good source of iron and fiber.

Spinach is a cool-weather leafy green, and one of the first seasonal offerings at CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farms and and farm markets, or if you’re lucky enough, from your own garden. Like any veggie that can be cooked and eaten the same day it’s pulled from the earth, just-harvested spinach is incomparable. Later in the summer, you might like to explore Malabar and other varieties referred to as summer spinach; they have larger, thicker leaves and stems, more akin to chard than its small and tender cool-weather cousins. more→

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