Passover Mock Chopped Liver (Mushroom, Cashew, and Onion)

Passover Mock chopped liver (Mushroom, Cashew, and Onion)

I don’t care for the name of this dish, but it’s a Jewish faux classic. It might look a bit like the dish it’s intending to imitate, but it tastes nothing like it — thank goodness! Another version is made with green beans (see Green Bean and Cashew Pâté — though Ashkenazik Jews don’t use green beans during the Passover week). The essential difference between this and the other recipe on this site is the use of mushrooms; both are simple and tasty. Serve with matzo or matzo crackers or raw veggies

Makes: About 2 cups

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 2 cups sliced mushrooms (use white, baby bella, or cremini)
  • 3/4 cup roasted cashews (see note)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, or to taste
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a medium skillet. Sauté the onions slowly over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until nicely browned. Add the mushrooms and cook until they’ve wilted down.

Combine the onions and mushrooms with the remaining ingredients in the container of a food processor. Process until smoothly pureed, scraping down the sides as needed.

Serve at once with matzo, matzo crackers, or raw veggies. Or store in a tightly lidded container in the fridge until needed, and bring to room temperature before serving.

Note: I like the added flavor given by the roasted cashews, but if you’re into raw cashews, by all means, use them.

Passover Mock chopped liver (Mushroom, Cashew, and Onion) recipe

image_pdfimage_print

22 comments on “Passover Mock Chopped Liver (Mushroom, Cashew, and Onion)

  1. Nava Post author

    Iris, I added the note on this, too. It really should have been there in the first place otherwise it is confusing. Thanks for the catch and happy holiday!

  2. Arlene

    Hi. Just finished preparing this. Delicious. I want to serve it the first night of Seder but feel like I should refrigerate it — will it go bad if I do, do you think? And I want to freeze some for someone to taste a month or two from now. What do you think? Thank you so much.

  3. Nava Post author

    Arlene, you should definitely at least refrigerate it —very tightly lidded. I think it should freeze fine, too. Maybe once it thaws you can give it a whirl in the food processor once again to improve the texture. Happy holiday!

  4. Robyn

    Hello. On chopped liver is there any replacements for nuts.? Have someone allergic to nuts and seeds. G
    Happy Passover to you and family
    18

  5. Nava Post author

    Hi Robyn — it’s hard to replace nuts and seeds for their rich flavor, and beans aren’t allowed in the Ashkenazik tradition, of course, so the only thing that comes to mind would be avocado. It’s also rich and flavorful. Maybe step up the lemon just a bit so that it doesn’t brown. The texture won’t be as firm without the nuts, but hopefully it will do the trick.

  6. Nava Post author

    Sandi, I’d say 3 days in the fridge, or make it sooner and freeze it. When it thaws out, whip it up again in the food processor, with a tiny bit of water if need be.

  7. Nava Post author

    Chaya, cashews lend kind of a creamy texture to this, and are very tasty, but you could use blanched almonds as well. Make sure to grind them to a fine powder. If it’s an allergy to tree nuts in general, though, it’s a trickier question!

  8. Chana Allison Solway

    Hi Nick,
    Yes, you can buy kosher for Passover paprika. Look in your local kosher market.

    Chag sameach!

  9. Nava Post author

    Thanks for answering Nick’s question, Chana! I wasn’t sure about it. Happy holidays to you as well.

  10. Max Exter

    I don’t understand how to toast the cashews in this context. Do you toast them in the oven, then soak them, and then add them to the food processor?

  11. Nava Post author

    Max, this recipe assumes you’re starting with cashews that you bought already pre-toasted (or roasted). Which they likely are, unless you only have raw cashews on hand. If that’s the case you can toast them in a toaster oven at 300 degrees F., or even on a dry skillet, stirring occasionally, until nice and golden brown.

  12. Nava Post author

    I changed “toasted” in the recipe to “roasted,” as the latter is what they’re usually called when you buy them. Sorry for the confusion.

  13. Max Exter

    Ok, so if you use roasted do you need to soak them, or do you just add them into the food processor directly? Thanks!

  14. Nava Post author

    No need to soak, Max. Just add to the processor and let it run for a while until the mixture is creamy. Enjoy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>