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Chickpea Zucchini Farinata with Cabernet-Red Onion Jam

Chickpea Zucchini Farinata With Cabernet-Red Onion Jam

In Liguria, they call it farinata, in Provence, they call it socca. In both cases, it’s a Mediterranean pancake made with garbanzo flour, so it’s not just luscious, it’s gluten-free. This recipe spices up the basic chickpea farinata by adding zucchini. Crispy crusted with a tender inside, it’s great by itself or with the red onion jam linked to this recipe in the ingredient list following. Continue Reading…

Baked Falafel with Smoky Tahini Dressing

Fried foods aren’t great for you, which is why this recipe for baked falafel is such a pleasure. Besides being healthier, it’s also much easier to make. Plus, frying is just messy. Serve these little balls of happiness with the accompanying Smoky Tahini Dressing atop rice or whole grains or in pitas or wraps with fresh tomatoes and lettuce.  Contributed by Dynise Balcavage, from Celebrate Vegan* (Lyons Press, ©2011). Continue Reading…

Indonesian-Style Vegetable Stew with Rice Noodles

Asian rice noodles

Certain Indonesian vegetable dishes are characteristically filled with colorful vegetables—in this case, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, and bell pepper. In this recipe, the vegetable stew is enveloped in a rich, spicy peanut sauce and embellished with rice noodles. This stew has so much going for it that you need only a simple salad to complete the meal. Continue Reading…

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine nuts and raisins

Spinach with pine nuts and raisins is a traditional Mediterranean side dish recipe that’s both elegant to serve and easy to make. Its mild and slightly sweet flavor provides a nice counterpoint to boldly-flavored Italian pasta dishes. But really, this Mediterranean side dish goes well with most any kind of meal, including those featuring grain dishes and curries. Continue Reading…

Classic Italian Minestrone Soup

Minestrone soup is an Italian cuisine classic. Here is our recipe for this classic Italian vegetable soup with beans and pasta!

Classic Italian Minestrone Soup
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • ⅜ cup dried white beans
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp unsalted butter
  • 1 yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 2 potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup spinach, chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • ½ cup canned crushed tomatoes
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 cup broken fettuccini pasta
  • salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Soak the white beans overnight in a bowl with just enough cold water to cover them.
  2. The next day, drain the water from the beans and rinse well. Cook in boiling water for 45 to 60 minutes. Reserve.
  3. In large saucepan, melt butter in oil over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes until golden brown.
  4. Add carrots and celery. Season and cook for another 2 minutes.
  5. Add the potatoes and stir. Continue cooking for 2 minutes.
  6. Stir in spinach and continue cooking for 2 minutes.
  7. Add vegetable stock, crushed tomatoes, and thyme sprigs. Season. Put a lid on the pan and cook the soup over low heat for about 2 hours, stirring occasionally. It’s important that the minestrone soup simmer gently.
  8. After 2 hours of cooking, add cooked beans and pasta and continue cooking for 20 minutes. Check the seasoning.
  9. Serve with a crusty piece of bread.

 

West African-Style Peanut and Okra Stew

West African Peanut Okra Stew

This West African-Style Peanut and Okra Stew recipe is a westernized version of a typical African dish. It’s much tastier than it sounds—try it! I first made this stew as part of an “African feast” at my kids’ school some years ago in conjunction with a class project. Privately, I doubted that any of the kids, then third and fourth graders, would eat this. I couldn’t have been more mistaken! The kids not only loved making it, but every last drop was scraped from the huge pot. Recipe adapted from The Vegetarian Family Cookbook. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky.

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Quick Teff Crêpes (Easy Substitute for Injera)

Teff flour

Although these teff crêpes don’t have quite the same texture or pronounced sourness typical of injera, they make a good stand-in on days when you want Ethiopian food quickly and don’t have time for the fermentation process or access to commercial injera. They have a slightly spongy-stretchy texture, with a small bit of tang from the yogurt and vinegar, and work well for scooping up sauces and stews. Recipe and photo from Teff Love: Adventures in Vegan Ethiopian Cooking by Kittee Berns © 2015, Book Publishing Company, reprinted by permission. For complete how-to on making authentic Ethiopian injera (the spongy moist flatbread shown in the photo, refer to the aforementioned book! Continue Reading…

Lentil Curry

You will find an exotic blend of flavors in this iconic dish of Indian cuisine. Coral lentils make a gourmet and unctuous dish with a variety of colorful vegetables and spices, softened by coconut milk.

Served with rice, this is a complete, balanced, and tasty dish.

Lentil Curry
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup Coral lentils
  • 1 onion
  • 1 sweet potato
  • 1 cup cauliflower florets
  • 1 can diced tomato
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon curry
  • 1 teaspoon "Indian" spice mix
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 pinch of cinnamon
  • A little olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Finely chop the onion. Peel the sweet potato and cut into cubes. Cook the chopped onion and garlic cloves in oil for about 5 minutes.
  2. Add sweet potato and cauliflower florets. Cook for another 5 minutes.
  3. Add the lentils, tomato, coconut milk, and the spices. Cook 30 minutes. At the end of cooking, add the salt and pepper.
  4. Serve immediately with rice.

 

Lebanese Lavash Bread

Lavash bread recipe

Large, flexible Lebanese lavash bread is made from a strong, yeasted wheat dough. It’s used for scooping or wrapping up vegetables and dips. You can bake them either on a sheet in a hot oven or on top of the stove, draped over an inverted wok or on a griddle if the breads are small enough to fit. As with pita, the yeast in this dough contributes to its flavor and texture; the bread doesn’t rise when baked. From Breadtime: A Down-to-Earth Cookbook for Bakers and Bread Lovers* by Susan Jane Cheney. Continue Reading…

Instant Kimchi Noodle Soup

Instant Kimchi Noodle Soup cropped

Like many penniless, voracious college students, instant ramen saw me through many late night study sessions back in the day. When the fridge was empty and the pantry otherwise bare, I could always count on a packet or two of freeze-dried noodles to see me through the lean times. They still hold a special place in my heart, the mere thought of those chewy wheat strands swimming in a salty sea of vegetable broth sends my head spinning with hunger, but I’d like to think that my palate has evolved quite a bit since then. Now my approach is a good deal spicier, fresher, and undoubtedly healthier.

No longer shackled to those quick-cooking fried noodle bricks, I’ve found that buckwheat soba noodles takes only a minute or two longer to reach al dente perfection while adding depth and a pleasant earthiness to the entire bowl. Kimchi is the star of the show here, so even if you don’t have all the vegetables suggested below, you can easily make up the difference by just piling on the peppery pickled cabbage instead. Read labels carefully to avoid fishy additions, or make your own if you have extra time to plan ahead. Recipe and photos from Instant Kimchi Noodle Soup are reprinted with permission from Real Food, Really Fast by Hannah Kaminsky © 2018. Continue Reading…

Fattouche Salad

fattouche

Fattouche salad is a Middle Eastern classic that’s not as well known in western culture as is tabbouleh, though maybe it should be — it’s just as delicious. It gets its characteristic touch from the use of small bits of toasted pita bread mingling with juicy tomatoes, cucumbers, and fresh herbs. It’s good all year round, though especially tasty with summer tomatoes Continue Reading…

Vegan Cholent

Vegan cholent

Cholent is a Jewish classic that can be considered an early predecessor to slow-cooker recipes. In its original form, it’s put in the oven before the Sabbath and cooked at a very low temperature for about 12 hours so that it can be eaten for the Sabbath midday or late afternoon meal. It’s one of the rare Eastern European Jewish specialties that highlights beans. There is a Sephardic cousin to this recipe called hamin. Continue Reading…

Curried Yam Stew

Curried yam stew by John McDougall

This one-pot meal contains many of the plant-based world’s favorite foods: chickpeas, spinach, and yams. It is easy to prepare, cooks quickly, and tastes delicious. Adapted from The Healthiest Diet On the Planet: Why the Foods You Love—Pizza, Pancakes, Potatoes, Pasta and More—Are the Solution to Preventing Disease and Looking and Feeling your Best Copyright ©2016 by Dr. John McDougall & Mary McDougall. Published by HarperOne, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, reprinted by permission. Photo by Jennifer Davick Photography. 

Continue Reading…

Polenta with a Variety of Toppings

Polenta with Spinach and Tomatoes

Polenta is the Italian name for a basic cornmeal mush that can be served on its own or with a variety of toppings (see variations after recipe box). It’s a comforting, naturally gluten-free grain dish that kids and picky eaters will love! When mine were growing up, they loved this with a side of steamed broccoli, and a platter of raw veggies with a dip. Thanks to Colavita for supplying the Instant Polenta used in this recipe, which not only cooks up super-fast, but is extra smooth. Photos by Evan Atlas. Continue Reading…

Thai Red Curry with Winter Squash, Mushrooms, and Broccoli

Pressure-Cooked Thai Red Curry

This is a perfect winter dish. You’ll be wowed by the flavor of this fusion-style dish, where winter squash pairs very well with Thai curry. The mushrooms add earthiness and a lot of texture, while the broccoli (or greens) adds freshness. Excerpted from Vegan Under Pressure: Perfect Vegan Meals Made Quick and Easy in Your Pressure Cooker © 2016 by Jill Nussinow. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo © Lauren Volo.

Continue Reading…

Vegan Cassoulet (White Bean and Vegetable Stew)

Vegan Cassoulet

Cassoulet is a French comfort food — a rich, slow-cooked white bean stew originating from the south of France. I first came across cassoulet at the grocery store in St. Maarten (it was sitting among the canned beans), but it wasn’t until I was actually in France that I came to appreciate the cultural significance of this dish. Each region has its own variation that reflects local specialties and in that tradition, I’ve created a vegan version. Serve with a crusty whole-grain bread. Recipe and photo from Happy Herbivore Abroad by Lindsay S. Nixon ©2012, Ben Bella Books. Reprinted by permission.

Continue Reading…

Masala Lentils (Sabut Masoor)

Masala lentil dal by Vegan Richa

If you want to impress someone with a dal, make it this one. Don’t be afraid of the number of spices—it is quite simple to make. The spices and garlic are blended to a paste and fried in the oil. A hot sauce (chiles, garlic, and vinegar) in the tadka is another secret to getting the right flavor profile. Serve this as a part of a meal, or with rice or naan or other flatbread. Recipe and photos from Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen * © 2015 by Richa Hingle. Vegan Heritage Press, LLC. reprinted by permission.

Masala Lentils (Sabut Masoor)
Author: 
Recipe type: Main dish
Cuisine: Indian / Vegan
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
A hot sauce (chiles, garlic, and vinegar) is the secret to getting the right flavor profile in this lentil dal. Serve this as a part of a meal, or with rice or naan or other flatbread.
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup brown lentils, washed and drained
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons safflower or other neutral oil
  • ½ cup finely chopped red or white onion
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • ½ teaspoon ground cardamom
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon fenugreek leaves or ⅛ teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 1 teaspoon sweet or hot paprika
  • ⅛ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1½ tablespoons sriracha or other hot sauce, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1½ cups chopped tomato
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro, for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon vegan butter (optional)
Instructions
  1. Combine the lentils with 2 cups of water in a saucepan. Partially cover and cook over medium heat until the lentils are tender, 25 to 30 minutes.
  2. While the lentils are cooking, make the tempering. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes.
  3. In a blender, combine the garlic, cumin, coriander, cardamom, cinnamon, fenugreek, paprika, nutmeg, black pepper, sriracha, and 2 tablespoons of water. Blend to combine well.
  4. Add this paste to the onions in the skillet. Cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and salt, and cook until the tomatoes are tender, about 8 minutes. Mash the larger tomato pieces.
  5. Add the tempering to the lentils. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for another 5 minutes.
  6. Taste and adjust salt and spice. Garnish with cilantro and vegan butter, if using, and serve hot.

 

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Masala lentils dal recipe by Vegan Richa

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