Nava

Stuffed Winter Squash with Mashed Potatoes and Peas

stuffed winter squash

This mild mashed potato-stuffed winter squash makes a great alternative main dish for Thanksgiving, but it’s any time during fall harvest season or as a winter comfort food. Double the recipe to feed a bigger crowd. Each stuffed winter squash half can serve as a main dish portion; or cut each half again to make 8 smaller side dish portions. Photos by Rachael Braun.

Winter Squash Stuffed with Mashed Potatoes and Peas
Author: 
Recipe type: Winter squash / Thanksgiving
Cuisine: Vegan / Healthy
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4 to 8
 
This mild mashed potato-stuffed squash makes a great alternative main dish for Thanksgiving, but it's any time during fall harvest season or as a winter comfort food.
Ingredients
  • 2 medium butternut or carnival squashes (1½ to 2 pounds each)
  • 6 medium potatoes, any variety, peeled and diced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, cut into thick 2-inch-long matchsticks
  • ½ cup unsweetened nondairy milk
  • 1 cup frozen petite green peas, thawed
  • 2 teaspoons salt-free seasoning blend (such as Spike or Mrs. Dash)
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • Nutritional yeast to taste, optional
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and fibers. Cover with aluminum foil and place the halves, cut side up, in a foil-lined shallow baking pan. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until easily pierced with a knife but still firm. When cool enough to handle, scoop out the pulp, leaving a firm ¼- to ½-inch-thick shell all around. Mash the pulp and set side until needed.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the potatoes with enough water to cover in a large saucepan. Bring to a simmer, then simmer steadily, covered, until the potatoes are tender, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  4. Heat the oil in a medium skillet. Add the onion and carrot and sauté over medium heat until the onion is golden and the carrot is tender-crisp. Remove from the heat.
  5. When the potatoes are done, drain them and transfer to a mixing bowl. Add the milk  and mash until smooth. Stir in the onion-carrot mixture, followed by the peas, nutritional yeast, and nutmeg. Add the reserved squash pulp, and stir gently until the mashed potato and squash are well integrated.
  6. Divide the mixture evenly among the four squash shells. Bake for 15 minutes, until well heated through. Serve each half as one substantial portion, or cut each half crosswise to make 8 smaller portions.

 

Variation: Substitute 1 large sweet potato for 2 of the other potatoes.

Stuffed Squash with Mashed Pot - 3

 

Stuffed Squash with Mashed Pot - 4

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When I made it again, I realized that there’s really no reason to bake it, as all the ingredients are cooked and ready, needing just a spin in the skillet to pull eveything together. However, if you’d like to make this more casserole-like, simply transfer to a small casserole dish and serve from there. Or, you can make it ahead of time, and then reheat briefly in the oven in a casserole dish. Serve this mild dish with plenty of green veggies — broccoli, broccoli rabe, greens, or green beans. more→

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Seriously—who needs fake meat when you can make hearty, beautifully textured dishes using grains and beans? This serves up deliciously on rolls, but if you’re not a bread person, you can serve the mixture in a lettuce-leaf cup or atop a corn tortilla. Serve with baked potatoes or sweet potatoes and any slaw-style salad. Fresh corn on the cob when in season is a great addition as well. Recipe from Plant Power: Transform Your Kitchen, Plate, and Life with More Than 150 Fresh and Flavorful Vegan Recipes by Nava Atlas. ©2014, published by HarperOne, reprinted by permission. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky.  

Serves: 4 to 6

  • 1/2 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed in a fine sieve
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil or 3 tablespoons broth or water
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 medium green bell pepper, finely diced
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked or one15- to 16-ounce can (drained and rinsed)
    pinto or red beans, coarsely mashed (or 1 1/2 cups cooked)
  • 15- to 16-ounce can tomato sauce or crushed tomatoes
  • 1 medium tomato, finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon agave nectar or maple syrup, or to taste
  • 2 teaspoons good-quality chili powder, or more, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 6 whole grain rolls, English muffins, or mini-pitas

Combine the quinoa with 1 cup water in a small saucepan. Bring to a slow boil, then lower the heat, cover, and simmer until the water is absorbed, about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil, broth, or water in a medium skillet. Add the onion and sauté until translucent. Add the bell pepper and sauté until both are golden.

Add the remaining ingredients except the bread of choice, and bring to a gentle simmer. Cook over medium-low heat, loosely covered, for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Let the skillet stand off the heat for 5 minutes to allow the flavors to mingle further and for the quinoa to absorb the tomato flavors.

Evenly spoon the filling over the bottoms of whole-grain rolls, cover with the tops, or serve open-faced.

Nutritional Information:
Per serving: 252 calories with oil, 223 without oil; 5g fat with oil, 2 g fat without oil; 400 mg sodium; 44g carbs; 9g fiber; 4.2g sugar; 11g protein

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