Chile Peppers 101— a Beginner’s Guide

Red chili peppers

Excerpted from Hot Vegan: 200 sultry & full-flavored recipes from around the world by Robin Robertson/Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC © 2014. Reprinted by permission. To put the “hot” in “hot and spicy,” we generally look to chiles as the world’s most universally popular heat source. Erroneously called chile “peppers,” attributed to an error by Christopher Columbus, chiles are not peppers at all, but actually fruits. They are used in a wide variety of cuisines throughout the world in a variety of forms. You can buy them whole, fresh, dried, canned, and jarred in the form of chili oil, paste, and powder, as well as hot red pepper flakes and ground red pepper, or cayenne. Many hot condiments are made with chiles, and these include chili sauce, hot bean sauce, salsas, and various chutneys. Tabasco, a particularly popular brand of hot chili sauce, is in such wide use that it goes by its brand name. more→

image_pdfimage_print

10 Ways to be a Frugal Vegan

Pantry staples -grains, beans, pasta

“I’d think about going vegan but it’s too expensive.” How many times have we heard someone express a sentiment like this or imply that eating being vegan is just for the affluent? How often have we ourselves thought, “Well, I’m spending more now but I will make up for it with my lack of medical bills.” (I hope.) Truth be told, it is more expensive to eat fresh, whole foods than to eat off of dollar menus — at least at the outset, because a diet high in animal products can be quite expensive to us down the road – but there are ways to cut that back while not sacrificing an emphasis on unprocessed, natural foods. Here are some simple but effective strategies for cutting back on your food expenses. Excerpted from this article on Vegan Street, where you’ll find 10 additional strategies for being a frugal vegan!

more→

image_pdfimage_print

Two Potato Kugel

White and sweet potato kugel

This potato kugel (which is a baked pudding or a casserole) is reminiscent of my grandmother’s, but I kicked up the nutritional profile a bit with the inclusion of sweet potatoes and taking out the eggs. This version is less rich but still full of potato-y comfort, a cross between hashed browns and scalloped potatoes, and a great side dish at a Passover meal. Being gluten-free, I omitted the traditional matzo meal, but feel free to add that as described if you have no issues with wheat. By the way, a mandolin slicer works great for getting the potatoes into uniform matchsticks. Recipe and photo contributed by Maria Rose from Vegan Street. more→

image_pdfimage_print

Book Review: Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romero

Salad samurai  by Terry Hope romero coverReview contributed by Marla Rose, Vegan Street. Is salad an often overlooked culinary art form? According to one creative cookbook, yes. A second book has just been released that seconds the “Heck, yeah, vegan salads!” sentiment and it comes from accomplished cookbook author Terry Hope Romero As you can probably see, I am an unabashed fangirl of Terry’s oeuvre. That being said, I think that I can be unbiased enough to still be critical-minded about her work to give it a fair review and I am pleased to say that her new cookbook, Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to Be Vegan To Love,* is one that I can highly recommend.

more→

image_pdfimage_print