Vegetables All Year Round

Asparagus, Squash, and Red Bell Pepper Sauté

Asparagus, squash, and red bell pepper sauté

An appealing vegetable trio — asparagus, zucchini or summer squash, and red bell peppers — is enlivened by a wine-scented sauté. This colorful veggie side dish is perfect for embellishing everyday meals as well as spring holiday dinners. 
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Hungarian-Style Noodles with Cabbage and Poppy Seeds

Hungarian Style Noodles with Cabbage

The preparation of this tasty Slavic-inspired dish can be greatly simplified by using pre-shredded coleslaw cabbage, but for flavor, I prefer a fresh green cabbage. For a complete, easy meal, serve with a simple bean dish and a salad of mixed greens, tomatoes, peppers, and carrots. Photos by Rachael Braun.

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Old-School Okra and Tomatoes

fresh okra

There are a couple of techniques that prevent okra from becoming too slimy. First and foremost, don’t overcook it. When okra is cooked to just tender, it is fresh and crispy, not “ropey”. The other technique is cooking okra with acid. This recipe uses both tomato and and a bit of red wine for best results. Adapted and reprinted with permission from Okra, a Savor the South® cookbook by Virginia Willis, copyright © 2014. Published by University of North Carolina Press. more→

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Spicy Quinoa-Carrot Slaw

Quinoa_Spicy Quinoa-Carrot Slaw

This simple side dish comes together very quickly if you have cooked quinoa on hand in the refrigerator. For even faster prep, use bagged shredded carrots and break the speed limit. Recipe  from Quinoa: High Protein, Gluten-Free* by Beth Geisler with recipes by Jo Stepaniak, @2014 Books Alive, Summertown, TN, reprinted by permission. Photo by Andrew Schmidt.
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Russian Beet and Potato Salad

Salad with beetroot,potatoes,carrots and cucumber ( Beet Salad- Vinegret)

Here’s a simple, classic potato salad made vivid with beets. If you have access to golden beets, by all means, use them. They’re even sweeter than red beets, and keep their vivid color to themselves more than red beets do. Is this salad really Russian? I have no idea; it is really good, though, especially if you like beets! more→

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Cauliflower ‘Risotto’

cauliflower risotto

One of my favorite meals to make is risotto. I actually don’t mind the laborious process; it’s quite meditative and helps slow you down. A little splash of water, a stir, a sip of wine – so relaxing! But it’s just not realistic on a weeknight when time is limited and there’s a lot going on. We had our risotto with a side of roasted asparagus (chopping it and stirring it in is also an option) but you can easily adapt this risotto with ingredients you have on hand; add mushrooms, peas, tomatoes, basil, or other veggies and herbs you may be craving. Recipe and photos contributed by Sophia Zergiotis, from Love and Lentilsmore→

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Sweet Potato Salad with Pecans

Sweet potato salad with pecans

This simple sweet potato salad, developed by Ginny Messina, is a great choice when you want something a little different for a picnic or potluck. It’s also a wonderful addition to fall and winter holiday meals. From Never Too Late to Go Vegan: The Over-50 Guide to Adopting and Thriving on a Plant-Based Diet,* copyright © Carol J. Adams, Patti Breitman, Virginia Messina, 2014. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Photos by Rachael Braun.

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Garlicky Greens Pasta with Gomasio

Garlic Greens and Pasta

Garlicky pasta is embellished with heaps of nutrients from greens and gomasio. Gomasio is a condiment used in Japanese cuisine as well as a staple of the macrobiotic diet. It has an earthy, toasty, salty flavor and can be used on almost anything…pasta, rice, popcorn or salads. However, it is more than just added flavor, it provides a plethora of trace minerals essential for health, including thyroid function.  You can even consider gomasio a “remineralizing seasoning.” Recipe and photos contributed by Cristina Cavanaugh, from BeginWithin Nutrition. more→

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